PRIDE KEEPS SHOWING UP AND SHOWING OUT

Pride shows its hand in multiple instances when we demand our way over the lives of others. Pride loves applause, clamouring for center stage. We cherish the “pat on the back,” wish for acclaim, and we do all we can to win the approval of others. Not all talented people are proud, not all handsome or beautiful people are proud, not all rich people are proud. But richly defined, pride steals the attention for ourselves. Turning each conversation around to yourself, even when the story is about another person.

 

Pride is the epidemic of self, flesh puffed up. It majors on our territory at the expense of other’s needs. Craving the limelight, crashing the party, and pouting when not acknowledged. Pride is the onslaught of humility, the massacre of motivation and the destruction of benevolence. It is difficult to care for someone else when we are working so hard to build our own statue.

 

THE STRUGGLE FOR CONFIDENCE
We like to be accepted. There is a healthy approach to winning friends and influencing people while finding our confidence is in Jesus Christ. We are who we are, we do what we do, and we operate in the gifts by the grace and strength of our Lord Jesus Christ. Confidence is in a close and viable relationship with Jesus, to pull away strikes at our confidential level but to draw near to Him brings confidence to a higher level.

STOP CONSTRUCTION
Don’t build your own statue. Building yourself up is pride and is an indicator of inner needs of emotional security. Maturity ceases building confidence and security on “what I have done,” while humility stops construction of pride and confesses “all that Jesus has done.”

DEFLECT ALL THE GLORY TO HIM
We are a mirror, not a solar panel. A solar panel absorbs sunlight to generate electricity. While this illustration is not comprehensive, it illustrates the point. Pride is when we absorb the applause and praise for our self. A mirror reflects light and humility deflects praise to Jesus. One friend said it like this, “Give the glory to Jesus and not keep it to yourself.”

CONFESS ARROGANCE
Confess it to Jesus. We may struggle from time to time with pride. It will rise but with confession bring it to Christ and watch pride diminish in our life. Walk with the Lord each day and allow the Spirit of God to infiltrate your life.

 

Copyright by Jim Laudell. Materials may not be copied, reproduced or distributed without the written permission of the author. You may share on Facebook, Twitter, and other forms of social media while giving credit to the author. This post should not be construed as medical, legal or professional advice.

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THE SMALL CHURCH PASTORS FIRST THREE YEARS

Pastor Smith had pastored for two years in a small church and noticed some startling information. “If you pastor a church for three years, the problems you face are your problems, not your predecessors.” The problem was Pastor Smith was still facing a long-term board who refused his suggestions for change and much of the congregation contently enjoyed their Sunday dinners.

Pastoral statistics and church analysis and armchair coaches admonish Pastors, it will take three years for the church to become your church. Or, another comment, “You won’t notice any significant change until you reach three years or more.”

Under close observation though, a lot is weighing on this perceived “three-year” Nova.

 

A LOT DEPENDS ON THE PASTOR

WHAT IS HIS VISION? Does the pastor maintain a clear and consistent vision? Let’s be honest, your church may not look like the church down the road. Every church has its own personality. It may take two or three years to define the vision for the church. Pastor, you can bring your experience from the last church but you can’t bring your vision from the last church. Each church vision fits the church, the community, the people and by God’s directives.
WHAT IS HIS MINISTRY STYLE? There is a difference in a teaching pastor, a lead pastor or an evangelistic pastor. Each fulfills their gift and calling and each important to the ministry but each style will reveal varied results.
1Co 3:6-9 I have planted, Apollos watered; but God gave the increase. So then neither is he that planteth anything, neither he that watereth; but God that giveth the increase. Now he that planteth and he that watereth are one: and every man shall receive his own reward according to his own labour. For we are labourers together with God: ye are God’s husbandry, ye are God’s building.
The ministry style may see immediate growth in much-needed areas and be lacking in other areas of the church health.

 

A LOT DEPENDS ON THE CHURCH

WHAT IS AROUND THE CHURCH? A church filled with older people may have difficulty reaching out without prayerful introspection. Change may not be achievable in a short three-year span. However, if the church saw the need before the new Pastor arrived, the church may be ready to make immediate and significant changes. If the church doesn’t realize the need, it may take three years or more to convince the congregation of changes needed.

WHAT ARE THE NEEDS OF THE CHURCH? Finding the needs of the church and the needs of the community may be the key to making adjustments in the church. A church that majors on offerings and participants, only to watch both decrease, will complain about the problem but may not be willing to change progressively. Some church changes may be years down the road no matter how hard the pastor has pushed to make things happen. A wise pastor who finds needs and finds ways to meet the needs may have a better chance at making changes within the three-year window.

Causally speaking, three to five years a Pastor needs to make himself known in the community and the church, establishing his style of ministry and finding the needs of the church and community. However, the time for change may be shorter than three years or longer than five years, depending on the leadership and the congregational responses.

To begin the “three-year” process,
First, pray privately for a clear and consist vision for the personality of your church.
Secondly, begin to meet with the church regularly for prayer.
Thirdly, meet regularly with community leaders and your church leaders discussing your five year and ten year needs and goals.
Fourthly, check for funds to be earmarked for outreach and to equip the church for a change.
Lastly, communicate and implement vision with the church team (inner circle).

Three years may not be the turning point. A pastor may be able to baby step into changes before the first year and make one significant change in the second year. You may see the most important changes in your third or fourth year but time is not the deciding factor only God’s directive and calling on your life. Take heart, Pastor, all heaven is behind you.

Copyright by Jim Laudell. Materials may not be copied, reproduced or distributed without the written permission of the author. You may share on Facebook, Twitter, and other forms of social media while giving credit to the author. This post should not be construed as medical, legal or professional advice.

Do I Have to Forgive?

Max walked in the door and one of the women in the room ducked her head. Two men cut their eyes towards each other. It was obvious from the body language in the room, Max was a difficult person to deal with. Meeting with Max in a group was destined for disaster so he and I slipped into a private room. He sat down roughly and quickly asked, “What is this all about?”

After a brief exchange, I asked, “Max, tell me about yourself.” And for the next twenty minutes Max told me about his feelings of rejection when his father left his mother,and two sisters, He told me about his mother passing away at an early age. His wife, after ten short years, she died in a car accident and about his recent doctor’s appointment. Then I began to understand why Max was rough around the edges.

Before Max walked back into the room I spoke to the group about some of the things Max had shared with me, explaining to them why he needed, love, support and forgiveness. As Max walked into the room, the group stood, each one hugging him and expressing kind and supportive words. The atmosphere in the room changed.

Forgiveness changes the atmosphere. But may not change the circumstances.

When Jesus died on the cross he was:

Condemned by the Mob

Accused by the Religious

Crucified by the Authorities

Mocked by the Soldiers

Tested by the Alcoholic Offer

Dishonored by the Priests

Blasphemed by the Sinners

Ridiculed by the Thief

Tormented by the Nails

Yet, he cried, “Father, forgive them, they know not what they do.”

Praying for you today to be able to forgive and change the atmosphere in your relationship.

*The name and details of the aforementioned story is fictious to illustrate a point.